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Tourist Information

Table of Contents

General Information

Introduction

Citizens of European Union (EU) member states can travel to Italy with their national identity card only. People from countries that do not issue ID cards, such as the UK , must carry a valid passport. All non-EU nationals must have a full valid passport. If your passport is stolen or lost while in Italy, notify the police and obtain a statement, and then contact your embassy or consulate as soon as possible.

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Visas

Italy is among the 15 countries that have signed the Schengen Convention, an agreement whereby all EU member countries (except UK and Ireland) plus Iceland and Norway , agreed to abolish controls at common borders. Legal residents of one Schengen country do not require a visa for another Schengen country. Citizens of UK and Ireland are also exempt from visa requirements for Schengen countries, including Canada , Japan , New Zealand and Switzerland , do not require visas for tourist visits of up to 90 days to any Schengen country. Various other nationals not covered by the Schengen exemption can also spend up to 90 days in Italy without a visa. These include Australian, Israeli and US citizens. If you are a citizen of a country not mentioned in this section, you should check with an Italian consulate about the visa requirements for citizens from your country. The standard tourist visa issued by Italian consulates is the Schengen visa, valid for up to 90 days. A Schengen visa issued by one Schengen country is generally valid for traveling in other Schengen countries. However, individual Schengen countries may impose additional restrictions on certain nationalities. It is therefore worth checking visa regulations with the consulate of each Schengen country you plan to visit. It's now mandatory that you apply for a Schengen visa in your country of residence. Precise instructions about visa requirements can be found on the web page of the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (the instructions in English are at the end of the page). If you require a personal letter of invitation to attend the Conference, please contact the ECIS 2003 Secretariat by e-mail. A signed letter will then be mailed. This letter of invitation does not imply an invited talk or waiver of registration fees.

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Driving Licence & Permits

If you plan to drive while in Italy , you will need to carry your driver's licence. All EU member states' driving licences are fully recognised throughout Europe , regardless of your length of stay. However, if you are coming from the UK and hold an old-style green driving licence, you'll need to obtain an International Driving Permit (IDP). Those with a non-EU licence are supposed to obtain an IDP to accompany their national licence. In practice, you'll probably be ok with national licences from countries such as Australia , Canada and the USA . If you decide to get an IDP, your national automobile association can issue them. They are valid for 12 months and must be kept with your proper licence. Those driving their own vehicles will need to carry the vehicle's papers and insurance.

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Electricity Supply

Electricity in Italy is supplied at 220V, 50Hz. The 2-pin or 3-pin connecting plugs are different from those used in some Countries e.g. USA , UK , or Japan . Hotel may provide suitable outlet for electric appliances.

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Telephone Service

The country code for Italy is 39 and the area code for Napoli area is 081. Public telephones are available for local, long distance and international (overseas) calls, operating with phone cards (available at news stands, tobacconists and coffee shops), credit cards or coins.

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Banking Service

The official currency in Italy is Euro. Banks are usually open from Monday to Friday from 8:30 am to 1:30 pm and from 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm. Exchange facilities are available at the airport, in hotels, and at exchange counters. Major credit cards are accepted in Italy.

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The Weather in Napoli

In Napoli you can enjoy the wonderful Mediterranean weather. The sun shines 250 days per year. Even in the hot August days a light wind coming from the sea will accompany your stay. Anyway in those days it would be useful to stay in the shadow between 1:00 pm and 3:00 am
The average temperatures during the summer are between 25° C (77° F) and 31° C (88° F). The autumns are sometimes damp with some rainy days. In the winter the are less rainy days and the temperatures are between 4° C (40° F) and 11° C  (52° F), but you should not be surprised if you will get a sunny day with 16° C (61° F) in the middle of January.

In July the weather in Napoli is usually pleasant and mild. The city offers optimal conditions for intellectually stimulating and socially enjoyable occasions.

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Tourist Information about Napoli

Introduction

Napoli is the capital of the Campania region. A city of art that has always been nurtured by the spectacular marine landscape formed by its gulf in the shadow of Mount Vesuvius.

“...Compared to Naples, the old capital of the world on the banks of the Tiber seems a gloomy convent in an ill-chosen position...”

wrote Goethe, despites the fact that he loved Rome. He went on to add,

“...here men live in paradise and they need not look around...”

Source:
http://www.travelplan.it/reg_cam_nap_page.htm

Other Sources:
http://goitaly.about.com/library/weekly/aa060802a.htm
http://www.informer.it/magazine/travel/trav2167.asp
http://www.italy-weekly-rentals.com/webpages/.../napoli.htm

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Historical Background

History books tell us that the Greeks arrived in Napoli in stages. In the ninth century B.C. , they arrived on the island of Pithecusa (Ischia), in the following century, they arrived on the island of Cuma, and it was only in the sixth century B.C. that they founded Parthenope on the isle of Megaride, then extended to "Monte Echia" (the Pizzafalcone hill), which was more of a commercial centre than a city. In 470, the inhabitants of Cuma founded a real city in the east (on the site of the current historic city centre), which they called Neapolis ...

Source:
http://naplesit.ags.myareaguide.com/

Other sources:
http://www.ips.it/turismo/regioni/nap_stoe.html http://www.eurotravelling.net/italy/napoli/napoli_history.htm

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District Guide

[Napoli]

The city is divided into 21 zones, and it has so many monuments that it is rightfully known as "an open air museum". Meanwhile, here is a little guide to allow you to choose the most significant places of interest and tourist attractions, should you find yourself in this glorious city, but with time as your enemy ...

Source:
http://naplesit.ags.myareaguide.com/detail.html?cityguide=gen_intro

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Recommended to

[Spaccanapoli]

There is a street in Napoli that splits the city from East to West; it is in fact a series of streets that follow one another consecutively, crossing some of the most important main roads of the city and some of its monumental piazzas. This long straight gash is known as Spaccanapoli and it is visible from the top of "Vomero" where "San Martino" looks on to the maze of palaces, roofs, churches, cupolas, spires, roads and side streets which have been the beating heart of the city for more than two thousand years ...

Source:
http://naplesit.ags.myareaguide.com/detail.html?cityguide=tours

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Tourist attractions

[Castel Nuovo]

There are many attractions within the city. The "Museo Archeologico Nazionale" of Napoli contains a large collection of Roman artefacts from Pompei and Herculaneum as well as the Farnese Marbles, some of the greatest surviving Roman statues, an amazing numismatic collection; the "Museo Nazionale di Capodimonte" contains art collections including works by Michelangelo, Raffaello, Botticelli and Caravaggio. Napoli is the home of the "Teatro San Carlo", the oldest active opera house in Europe, which opened its doors on November 4, 1737.
Other notable monuments are:

  • "Castel dell'Ovo"
  • "Castel Nuovo"
  • "Palazzo Reale"
  • "Piazza del Plebiscito"
  • "Cattedrale di San Gennaro"
  • "Chiesa di Santa Chiara"
  • "Chiesa di San Lorenzo Maggiore"
  • "Chiesa di Santa Maria Donna Regina"
  • "Chiesa del Gesù Nuovo"
  • "Chiesa di San Domenico Maggiore"

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Under Napoli

Guided tours operate around the Stratification of Napoli which shows the city through the layers laid down across history. Subterranean Napoli consists of old Greco-Roman reservoirs dug out from the soft tufo stone on which, and from which, the city is built. You can visit approximately one kilometre of the many kilometres of tunnels under the city. There are also large catacombs in and around the city.

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Food & Drink

 

Napoli is by tradition the home of pizza. It is the birthplace of the "Pizza Margherita", which traditionally is made with "mozzarella" (a local cheese) and "pomodoro" (tomato) and basil - each representing the red, white, and green of the Italian flag. The pizza was created as homage to Queen Margherita when she visited the city. The "vera pizza" (true pizza) should be made in a wood-burning oven.

Napoli is also famous for its pasta dishes, where spaghetti is often served with "sugo di pomodoro", a tomato sauce.

[Sfogliatella]

Napoli offers several kinds of cakes: the most famous of which is perhaps the "babà" and "sciù". The "babà" is a mushroom-shaped piece of leavened sweet paste, soaked with an orange flavoured mixture of rum and water. Choux is a small "bubble" of leavened paste stuffed with light cream, usually coffee or chocolate flavoured. Another typical Neapolitan pastry is the "sfogliatella" ("riccia" or "frolla").

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Tourist Information near Napoli

Around Napoli

The islands of Procida, (famously used as the set for much of il Postino), Capri and Ischia can all be reached quickly by Aliscafi (twin-hulled ferries). Sorrento and the "Costiera Amalfitana" are situated south of Napoli. The Roman ruins of Pompei and Herculaneum (destroyed in the A.D. 79 eruption of Vesuvius) are also nearby.

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Roman Painting

In the first century the Roman Empire contains many cities, but none in a more beautiful setting than the cities and towns lining the Bay of Napoli. On the 24th of August, 79 A.D., volcanic ash spews from Mt. Vesuvius. Pompei and nearby Herculaneum disappear from the face of the earth. Gradually grass and vines cover the land where the towns stood. The local people eventually forget even the name of the buried towns ...

Source:
http://www.art-and-archaeology.com/roman/painting.html

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Pompei: Excavation

[Pompei]

The ancient town, of Greek origins, was destroyed and buried, together with Pompei, Oplontis, Stabiae and other small villages by the "Vesuvio" eruption of A.D. 79. During the mid-eighteenth century excavations of part of the buried town brought to light the marine side of the old town. A lot of human skeletons were found at the ancient shoreline, suggesting that numerous inhabitants attempted to escape but perished because of the pyroclastic flow and the volcanic gases. The excavation had began quite by accident in 1709 when during the digging of a well, some workers discovered a wall which was later found to be one of the stages of the ancient theatre ...

Source:
http://www.eurotravelling.net/italy/pompeii/pompeii.htm

Other sources:
http://ww2.webcomp.com/virtuale/us/napoli/movie.htm
http://harpy.uccs.edu/roman/html/pompeiislides.html
http://www.italy-weekly-rentals.com/webpages/.../pompei.htm

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Pompei: Villa dei Misteri

[Villa dei Misteri]

In the first century the Roman Empire contains many cities, but none in a more beautiful setting than the cities and towns lining the Bay of Napoli. On the 24th of August, 79 A.D., volcanic ash spews from "Monte Vesuvio". Pompei and nearby Herculaneum disappear from the face of the earth. Gradually grass and vines cover the land where the towns stood. The local people eventually forget even the name of the buried towns ...

Source:
http://jcccnet.johnco.cc.ks.us/~jjackson/villa.html

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Herculaneum

The ancient town, of Greek origins, was destroyed and buried, together with Pompei, Oplontis, Stabiae and other small villages by the "Vesuvio" eruption of A.D. 79. During the mid-eighteenth century excavations of part of the buried town brought to light the marine side of the old town. A lot of human skeletons were found at the ancient shoreline, suggesting that numerous inhabitants attempted to escape but perished because of the pyroclastic flow and the volcanic gases. The excavation had began quite by accident in 1709 when during the digging of a well, some workers discovered a wall which was later found to be one of the stages of the ancient theatre ...

Source:
http://digilander.libero.it/erikagraphicdesign/Ancient%20town.htm

Other Sources:
http://www.italy-weekly-rentals.com/webpages/.../ercolano.htm

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Monte Vesuvio

[Vesuvio]

Monte Vesuvio is an active volcano, originated during the late Pleistocene Epoch. It is famous for its catastrophic eruption in 79 A.D. when the town of Pompei, Herculaneum, Oplonti and Stabiae were completely destroyed and buried in less than two days time. Pompei was buried under 10 feet (3 m) of tephra, while Herculaneum was buried under 75 feet (23 m) of ash deposited by a pyroclastic flow. More than 3300 people died during the eruption. During its history, "Monte Vesuvio" has alternated periods of intense eruptive activity to cycles of quiescence. Since the eruption of 79 A.D. it erupted violently twice: the first time in 472 A.D. and the second time in 1631 when almost 3500 people were killed ...

Source:
http://digilander.libero.it/erikagraphicdesign/MountVesuvius.htm

Other Sources:
http://www.vesuvioinrete.it/e_index.htm
http://volcano.und.edu/vwdocs/volc_images/img_vesuvius.html
http://www.italy-weekly-rentals.com/webpages/.../vesuvio.htm

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External links

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